Post-Colonial Reading: The Tempest by William Shakespeare


Post-Colonial Reading: The Tempest by William Shakespeare

Shalini S Rao

Shalini S Rao "Post-Colonial Reading: The Tempest by William Shakespeare" Published in International Journal of Trend in Research and Development (IJTRD), ISSN: 2394-9333, Special Issue | NSCCIGC-18 , March 2018, URL: http://www.ijtrd.com/papers/IJTRD16056.pdf

The main objective of this writing is to enable the writers to follow the academic discipline thatanalyze, explains and responds to the cultural legacy of colonialism. This is also to make the readers awareof the human consequences of external control and economic exploitation of native people. It studies theeffect of colonialism and juxtaposes post colonialism as a disciplinary and an inter-disciplinarymethodology among societies. The post-colonial literature often addresses the problems andconsequences of the decolonization of a country, especially questions relating to the political and culturalindependence of formerly subjugated people and also looks at themes such as racism and colonialism.Post-colonialism examines the social and political power relationships that sustain colonialism and neocolonialism,including the social, political and cultural narratives surrounding the colonizer and thecolonized. Post-colonial readings interrogate the processes, values and results of colonialism. We canlearn about this through reading the texts produced by the colonizers. The post-colonial writings such as“Heart of Darkness” and “The Tempest” shock us with their depiction of race, gender and ethnicity whichare out of step with our current ways of thinking. William Shakespeare's last play, “The Tempest” can beinterpreted in post-colonial perspective. The plot is based in an island and the description of it seems moresignificant as it pertains to colonies, which had been colonized at the time when the play was written. Thedrama revolves around how the colonizers captured the land of the natives and how they controlled thenative people (especially Caliban), their tradition and culture.

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Special Issue | NSCCIGC-18 , March 2018

2394-9333

IJTRD16056